18th July In History

It is hard to believe that a person will defy the norms and take everybody by surprise with her performance. Nadia Comaneci from Romania did just that on July 18th by scoring a perfect 10 in gymnastics when the judges thought that it was unachievable. Such people inspire others to believe that nothing is impossible. Another such story is that of U.S president Barack Obama whose memoir ‘Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance’ was published on this day. This is not all, more lessons to learn were available in print as Adolf Hitler’s autobiography ‘Mein Kampf’ was published. Crucial steps for strengthening democracy were taken when Uruguay adopted its first constitution and Britain introduced voting by secret ballot. The courteous practice of greeting people with a ‘hello’ began on 18th July when Thomas Alva Edison said ‘Halloo’ into the phonograph. July 18 is an important day in music history too as Brenda Lee’s song ‘I’m Sorry’ became the number one hit and Selena Quintanilla Perez’s ‘Dreaming of You’ album was released. The world found an alternate source of energy in Atomic electric power, which was distributed for commercial use for the first time in United States.


HISTORICAL EVENTS ON 18th July



362

Politics

Roman Emperor Julian Reaches Antioch

On 18th July 362, Roman Emperor Julian, also known as Flavius Claudius Julianus arrived at Antioch from Constantinople to plan his campaign to conquer the Persian Empire. Julian also hoped to gain the support of the Jews in Antioch. Julian formed an army consisting of 65,000 men to take on the Persians, but failed.


1290

Politics

King Edward I Banishes Jews From England

King Edward I of England banished all Jews from England on 17th July, 1290. Before expelling the Jews, King Edward I did not allow the Jews to collect interest. It was a perception then that Christianity did not allow lending of money. This affected the livelihood of the Jews and within a year 16,000 Jews left England.


1812

Politics

Treaty Of Orebro Is Signed By U.K, Sweden And Russia

The Treaty of Orebro, a city in Sweden, was ratified between Britain and Sweden on this day in 1812. On the same day Britain signed the Treaty of Orebro with Russia as well. The treaty helped in bringing peace between the two countries at war. Russia approved the treaty after its ties with France started deteriorating and Napoleon Bonaparte issued an order to invade Russia.


1830

Politics

Uruguay Adopts Its First Constitution

Uruguay adopted its first constitution on July 18, 1830. The country gained its freedom in 1828 after a conflict over its Eastern Province territory. Two parties, the Conservative Blancos and the Liberal Colorados, controlled Uruguay’s politics back then.


1841

Politics

Pedro II Is Crowned As Emperor Of Brazil

The coronation of the emperor of Brazi, Pedro II, also known as Dom Pedro de Alcântara, took place on 18th July, 1841. Pedro was the second and last emperor of Brazil. In his 49-yearra long tenure, Pedro strengthened his nation’s sovereignty by settling disputes with Britain and the United States of America. The emperor acquired some territory after the war with Paraguay.


1872

Politics

Voting By Secret Ballot Is Introduced In Britain

Voting by secret ballot was introduced for the first time in Britain by William Gladstone's Liberal government on this day in 1872. The House of Lords termed the idea as ‘cowardly’ and ‘unmanly’ and opposed it strongly. The method was first used in the same year at the by-polls in Pontefract in August.


1914

Politics

Aeronautical Division In U.S Army Is Replaced By Signal Corps

The Aeronautical Division of the U.S army was replaced by the Signal Corps, an Aviation Section, by the Congress, on 18th July 1914. This bill became a law after the President signed it. As per the law, the aviation department could operate army planes and also train officers.


1932

Politics

Saint Lawrence Deep Waterway Treaty Is Signed

The St Lawrence Deep Waterway Treaty was signed between the USA and Canada on 18th July, 1932, in Washington D.C. The development and generation of hydroelectric power was not a part of the agreement, since it was considered a domestic matter by President Herbert Hoover. According to the treaty, the completion of Welland canal and other areas of the St. Lawrence River were Canada’s responsibility to develop the waterway.


1940

Politics

Roosevelt Gets Nominated For The Third Term

Former American president Franklin Delano Roosevelt was nominated for the third time as a president on this eventful day. Roosevelt is the only one to have served four terms as president. During the four terms, he successfully managed the two biggest crises of his tenure- The Great Depression and the World War II.


1944

Politics

Japan’s Premier Hideki Tōjō Resigns

The Prime Minister of Japan, Hideki Tōjō and his cabinet resigned from office on 18th July, 1944. Hideki became the chief of the General Staff and practiced dictatorship after his popularity helped in japan emerging victorious in the Southeast Asia and western Pacific regions. The resignation came after Hideki’s government was weakened by the Allied attack on the Marina Island stretch.


1947

Politics

Truman Revises The Presidential Succession Act

Former American president Harry S. Truman signed the ‘Presidential Succession Act’ on this day in 1947. The act changed the original succession act that was passed in 1792. Under the new law, the speaker was given more prominence as compared to the Senate president. Truman argued that the speaker of the house was an elected official and was therefore more worthy than the Senate president.


1947

Politics

India Independence Act Comes Into Force

The India Independence Act 1947 came into existence on 18th July 1947 after getting the nod of the British royals. The United Kingdom parliament passed the act, which divided India into two new nations, namely India and Pakistan. The legislation was made by the British, who were then governed by Prime Minister Clement Attlee.


1955

Politics

USSR Grants $100 Million To Vietnam

The Soviet Union donated an aid of 400 million rubles (about $100 million) for the economic development of Hanoi, situated in North Vietnam, on 18th July 1955. This decision was taken after the Vietnamese president Ho Chi Minh and his ministers visited the country. Subsequently, Hanoi utilized the funds for industrialization.


387 BC

Wars

Romans And The Gallic Celts Fight The Battle Of Allia

The Roman army and the Gallic Celts locked horns near River Allia on July 18, 387 B.C, after Roman politician Quintus Fabius had a clash that offended the Gauls. The Gauls, led by the warlord Brennus, demanded that Rome should surrender those offenders who broke the rules of the war. This did not happen, so the Gauls entered Rome and attained victory over the Romans, in the battle of Allia.


1391

Wars

Kondurcha River Battle Is Fought

The first major battle between Turkic conqueror Timur and Tokhtamysh of Mongolia took place on this day in 1391. It was fought near the Kondurcha River, situated at the Golden Horde, which was a part of the Mongol Empire. Tokhtamysh's army tried their best to suppress Timur’s troops, but they lost the battle.


1857

Wars

French Governor Regains French Forces From Tal

French Governor of Senegal, Louis Faidherbe thwarted the advances of El Hadj Umar Tal in defeating the French colonial army. Faidherbe saved the French in a great way by bringing in relief troops on 18th July, 1857. Tal was a leader in West Africa who accepted Senegal River as the common boundary after signing a deal with Faidherbe in 1860.


1863

Wars

Union Forces Lose The Second Battle Of Fort Wagner

In the second battle of Fort Wagner, fought in South California, U.S, the ‘54th Massachusetts Infantry’ commander Colonel Robert Gould Shaw and his 272 men were killed on 18th July, 1863. This was the second unsuccessful assault on the Confederate forces at Fort Wagner, by the Union forces. The ‘54th Massachusetts Infantry’ was among the most popular regiments that consisted of African American soldiers as well as white officers.


1918

Wars

Allies Score Victory Over The Germans

During World War I, the Allied forces attacked the Marne region in Germany on 18th July, 1918. This event marked the end of the Second Battle of the Marne in favor of the Allies, since the Germans retreated. The forces of France, United States, Britain and Italy stood up against the German attack. The German forces fought under General Erich Von Ludendorff and the allies were led by Ferdinand Foch.


1936

Wars

Spanish Civil War Begins

The Spanish Civil War broke out on this day in 1936 when the military personnel in Spanish Morocco rebelled against the left-wing Spanish Republican government. The rebels were able to overtake key areas like Morocco and Northern parts of Spain, but the Republicans checked their advance in other areas. The Nationalists, considered rebels, got funds from Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany, while the USSR funded the Republicans.


1996

Wars

LTTE Captures Sri Lankan Army Base

On 18th July, 1996, The ‘Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE)’ seized a Sri Lankan army base, located in Mullaitivu town, during the Eelam War III. The base was the headquarters of the Sri Lankan Army’s ‘25 Brigade’. In the offensive, 1200 men were believed to be killed and the ‘LTTE’ got hold of huge swathes of weapons and military equipment.


64

Disasters & Natural Calamities

The Great Fire Of Rome Takes Place

The Great Fire of Rome broke out on 18th July, 64 AD, in the slums located close to Palatine Hill. Strong winds caused the fire to spread very quickly and the wrath continued for about 3 days. The fire completely destroyed three districts of Rome and claimed hundreds of lives. Many blame Emperor Nero for the fire because apparently it helped him gain political mileage. It is also believed that Nero disliked the slums and used the fire to revamp the area in an aesthetic manner. Some also believe that Nero started the fire because he wanted to check the rise of the Christians in Rome.


1996

Disasters & Natural Calamities

Storms Cause Saguenay Floods In Quebec, Canada

Heavy Rainfall that began on 18th July, 1996 and lasted till 21st July caused the worst floods in Canada’s history. The river Saguenay in Quebec, Canada, flooded the Saguenay region and took 10 lives. The rainfall caused due to storms, destroyed more than 1700 homes. For the first time, the losses in a weather related disaster in Canada touched the billion dollar mark.


1948

Sports

Car Racer Fangio Makes His European Racing Debut

It was on 18th July, 1948, that the legendary Argentinian car racer Juan Manuel Fangio participated in a European Formula-one event for the first time. Fangio had bagged five world titles, won 24 races and drove for several leading car manufacturers like ‘Mercedes-Benz’, ‘Ferrari’, and ‘Maserati’. He was nicknamed as ‘The Maestro’ and was famous for winning races even at his minimum speed.


1976

Sports

Comaneci Becomes The First To Score A Perfect 10 In Gymnastics

On July 18th, during the Montreal Olympic games of 1976, Romanian athlete Nadia Comaneci became the first to score a perfect 10 in gymnastics. The gymnast broke the notion that a perfect 10 was impossible to achieve, much to the embarrassment of the time keepers. Comaneci eventually earned the nickname ‘Little Miss Perfect’.


1960

Literature & Entertainment

Lee’s Song ‘I’m Sorry’ Rules The Billboard Charts

It was on this day in 1960 that American vocalist Brenda Lee’s song ‘I’m Sorry’ gained the number one spot on the Billboard charts. Lee, who is also known as ‘Little Miss Dynamite’ was just 15 years old back then and had been pursuing singing for 5 years. The album ‘Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree’ is considered her most successful work.


1966

Literature & Entertainment

Australian Series ‘Play School’ Aired For The First Time

On 18th July, 1966, ‘Play School’, the Australian television show targeted at children, was broadcast for the first time. The series was the longest running show of its kind in Australia television history. The series aims to educate and entertain children about music, art and craft, games, ideas and stories. The show celebrated 50 years in the year 2016.


1995

Literature & Entertainment

Obama’s ‘Dreams From My Father’ Gets Published

American President Barack Obama’s ‘Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance’ was published on this date in 1995. The book talks about the renowned politician’s family, his quest to find his father and what it means to be a Black American. It also traces his life from his adolescence to adulthood. The book was printed 13 years before Obama became president.


1995

Literature & Entertainment

Selena’s ‘Dreaming Of You’ Album Is Released

On July 18, 1995, ‘EMI Latin’ and ‘EMI Records’ jointly released Selena Quintanilla Perez’s final music album ‘Dreaming of You’. This collection consisted of both English and Latin songs and a few unheard tracks as well. With this album, Selena became the first Latino artist to bag the number one spot on the ‘Billboard 200’ chart. It also became the first song of a Spanish album to debut on the top spot of the ‘Billboard 200’.


1862

Trivia

Dent Blanche Peak Scaled For The First Time

T.S Kennedy, W Wigram and guide Jean Baptiste Croz created history by scaling the Dent Blanche peak on this day. Dent Blanche is a peak in the Pennine Alps mountain range that situated between Switzerland and Italy.


1877

Trivia

Edison Uses ‘Halloo’ On The Phonograph

On July 18, 1877, Thomas Alva Edison said ‘Halloo’ into the mouthpiece of a phonograph, while testing it and continued to use the word even later. The word eventually became the choice of telephone users worldwide for greeting. The word was derived from terms like hilla, halloa and hallo, used for calling out people from a distance.


1925

Trivia

Hitler’s Autobiography ‘Mein Kampf’Gets Printed

On 18th July 1925, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler’s autobiography ‘Mein Kampf’ (German for ‘My Struggle’) was published. Hitler wrote the book during his time at the Landsberg prison, where he was held captive for his involvement in the Beer Hall Putsch case. The book gained acceptance amongst the followers of Nazism and its second volume was printed in 1925.


1936

Trivia

Carl Mayer Invents The ‘Oscar Mayer Wienermobile’

July 18th, 1936, saw the launch of the ‘Wienermobile’, a funny looking vehicle meant to promote the products of the American food distribution firm ‘Oscar Mayer Corp’ at Chicago, Illinois. ‘Oscar Mayer Corp’ had a large hot dog shaped structure placed on the chassis of a truck, mainly to grab more attention of the consumers. The ‘Wienermobile’ was founded by Carl Mayer; the nephew of packaged pork maker Oscar Mayer.


1942

Trivia

Aircraft Messerschmitt Me 262 Takes Its Maiden Flight

On 18th July, 1942, the jet-propelled German fighter aircraft Messerschmitt Me 262 Schwalbe, flew for the first time. The plane’s speed was higher than that of other jets at that time, since it consisted of two Jumbo engines and wings, inclined at an angle of 18.5°. It was the first jet-propelled aircraft to be used in the combat operations of World War II.


1955

Trivia

Atomic Power Is Distributed For Commercial Use For First Time

Atomic electric power was distributed for commercial use for the first time on this day. The power was distributed to be utilized by homes and industries in the United States. The renowned firm ‘General Electric’ produced power at its West Milton facility.


1962

Trivia

U.S Congress Votes To Preserve Theodore Roosevelt’s Properties

The members of the United States’ Congress extended its support to the bill that was proposed to protect several properties & posessions associated with former President Theodore Roosevelt on 18th July, 1962. The assets that were to be preserved included Roosevelt’s home in Manhattan and his Sagamore Hill estate and all the Congress men voted in favor of this initiative. Theodore Roosevelt, also famously known as Teddy Roosevelt, won the Nobel Peace Prize for bringing an end to the Russian-Japanese War with his intervention.


1966

Trivia

‘Gemini 10’ Spacecraft Was Launched

On 18 July, 1966 the spacecraft ‘Gemini 10’ was launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida, U.S. The ‘Gemini 10’ or the ‘Gemini X’ was the eighth manned flight of the Gemini Project. One of the purposes of this space program was to carry out docking tests with the Gemina 10 Agena Target Vehicle. The mission conducted the first spacewalk from one spacecraft to another.


1968

Trivia

Technology Giant ‘Intel’ Was Founded

On this day, entrepreneurs Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore started their firm ‘N M Electronics’. The enterprise was later renamed ‘Intel’, an abbreviated form of ‘Integrated Electronics’. The company’s first office was opened at Mountain View, California. The firm’s prime objective was to make affordable semiconductor memory. In those days, silicon chip-based memory was far more expensive than the magnetic core ones.


1969

Trivia

Massachusetts Senator Kennedy Meets With A Mishap

On 18th July, 1969, Massachusetts Senator Edward Kennedy drove his car into a pond, causing the vehicle to submerge. Political campaign specialist Mary Jo Kopechne was killed in this horrifying accident. Kopechne was travelling along with Kennedy and both were returning from a party held at Chappaquiddick Island. The party, which was kind of a reunion for Kopechne and five other women associated with late Senator Robert F. Kennedy’s 1968 presidential campaign, was hosted by the political leader himself.


1981

Trivia

Violence Mars ‘Hunger Strike’ March In Ireland

Violence broke out at a demonstration in Dublin, the capital of Ireland, on this day in 1981. 10,000 citizens took out a street march to support the Republicans who went on a hunger strike in the Maze Prison, located in Ireland. Some demonstrators flung missiles at the police which spurred the violence. Around 200 people suffered injuries in the clash.


1982

Trivia

250 People Are Massacred In Guatemala

More than 250 people lost their lives in a deadly massacre which occurred at Plan de Sanchez, northern Guatemala, on 18th July, 1982. The massacre was carried out by the military forces. This incident is considered to be one of the most dreadful internal conflicts to have occurred in the Central American nation.


1984

Trivia

U.S Citizen Shoots Down 21 People

On 18th July 1984, the U.S citizen James Oliver Huberty opened fire with multiple arms at the customers of the popular eating joint ‘McDonald’s’ in San Ysidro, California. At least 21 persons were killed and 19 were wounded as a result of this merciless attack. Huberty was shot dead by the SWAT team on the same day at the restaurant. The restaurant was razed down after ‘McDonald’s’ officials shut it down.


1986

Trivia

Video Of ‘Titanic’s’ Wreckage Released

Several videos of the ill-fated British vessel ‘Titanic’ were released on 18th July, 1986. The videos of the wreckage were filmed during the first manned operation to the wreckage site. Minute details of the ship were revealed very clearly in the videos. The RMS Titanic was the biggest ship ever made and was believed to be unsinkable, but unfortunately sank on its very first journey.


1992

Trivia

9 Students Of The University In Lima Go Missing

Nine students and a professor belonging to the ‘Universidad Enrique Guzman y Valle’ (also known as ‘La Cantuta’) went missing on 18th July, 1992 in Lima, Peru. They were kidnapped and then killed by an elite military unit. The culprits were allegedly associated with the Peruvian revolutionary organization ‘Sendero Luminoso’.


1994

Trivia

Blast Kills 85 In Argentina

More than 600lbs of explosives were used for a deadly blast that occurred in front of the ‘Argentine Mutual Association’ (AMIA), in Buenos Aires, the Argentine capital on 18th July, 1994. The blast, which was one of the worst in the country, led to the collapse of the building and caused the death of 85 people. The attack affected South America's Jewish community the most, since many Jewish organizations’ offices, including a library and community archives were located in the building.


1994

Trivia

The Horrifying Tutsi Genocide Ends In Rwanda

The genocide in Rwanda, an African nation, came to end on 18th July, 1994. The genocide was carried out by extremists belonging to Hutu, an ethnic community, which constituted the majority. The Hutus wanted to eliminate the Tutsis, a minority group and anyone who opposed their actions. During the genocide, more than 800,000 civilians, mostly Tutsi people, were killed and 2,000,000 citizens fled the country.


1995

Trivia

Soufriere Hills Volcano Erupts

The Soufriere Hills volcano, which was dormant since 1630, became active on 18th July, 1995. The eruption, which occurred at the Caribbean island of Montserrat, caused several deaths and destroyed the capital city of Plymouth. Later, in 2006, the volcano again began spewing a plume of ash and stream, but it wasn’t as severe as the 1995 eruption.


2003

Trivia

Body Of British Scientist Recovered

The carcass of British scientist Dr. David Kelly was found in woodland, near his home, on 18th July, 2003. Dr. Kelly was involved in the controversy over the conspiracy involving the British Government before the war against Iraq. A report by journalist Andrew Gilligan said that the government had ‘sexed-up’ information to garner support for the Iraq war.


2003

Trivia

Basketball Star Kobe Bryant Is Charged With Sexual Assault

Basketball player Kobe Bryant was charged for sexually assaulting a teenager on 18th July, 2003. The incident took place at the resort in Colorado, where the victim worked in Colorado. However, at a press meet, Bryant maintained that the act was consensual and he was not guilty.


2012

Trivia

Israeli Tourist Bus Falls Prey To A Suicide Attack

A suicide bomber blew up an Israeli tourist bus at the Burgas airport, Bulgaria, on 18th July, 2012. The blast led to the death of five to seven tourists and wounded dozens of other people. The tourists were being taken to their respective hotels in the bus, when the blast occurred. Israel blamed Iran for the attack, saying that Iranian Hezbollah militants carried out the blast, but Iran denied the charges.


2013

Trivia

Detroit Files For Largest Municipal Bankruptcy In U.S. History

On 18th July 2013, the industrial city of Detroit, Michigan, filed for bankruptcy and the event earned a place in U.S history. Detroit municipal body was in a debt of $18 Billion, which meant that it might have to lay off its employees, sell its assets, and roll back services. The city was also unable to raise enough revenue to fund its expenses and pay its creditors.


People Born This Day

William Makepeace Thackeray
(1811-1863)
Author & Novelist [ British ]
Nelson Mandela
(1918-2013)
Anti-Apartheid Activist, President of ANC and Former President of South Africa [ South African ]
Kristen Bell
(1980-)
Actress, Singer [ American ]
Richard Branson
(1950-)
Entrepreneur [ British ]
Molly Brown
(1867-1932)
[ American ]
Thomas Kuhn
(1922-1996)
[ American ]
Hendrik Lorentz
(1853-1928)
Physicist [ Dutch ]
John Glenn
(1921-)
Tthe First American to Orbit the Earth [ American ]
Red Skelton
(1913-1997)
Comedian, Pantomimist [ American ]
Vin Diesel
(1967-)
Actor, Filmmaker [ American ]
Andrei Gromyko
(1909-1989)
Diplomat [ Russian ]
Priyanka Chopra
(1982-)
Film actress [ Indian ]
Mehdi Hassan
(1927-2012)
Ghazal Singer [ Pakistani ]
Hunter S. Thompson
(1937-2005)
Journalist and Author [ American ]
Roald Hoffmann
(1937-)
Theoretical Chemist [ American ]
Hartmut Michel
(1948-)
Biochemist [ German ]
Kaylee Quinn
(2004-)
Dancer, Model, and Actress [ American ]
Baddiewinkle (Helen Ruth Van Winkle)
(1928-)
Instagram Star [ American ]
Rosie Roff
(1989-)
Model [ British ]
James Brolin
(1940-)
Actor [ American ]
Lamar Johnson
(1994-)
Dancer [ Canadian ]
LostNUnbound
(1998-)
YouTuber [ American ]
Diana Williams
(1958-)
News Anchor, Journalist [ American ]


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